Category: News-WISE

Girls Who Code Update

WISE launched a Girls Who Code club in October and now we present a short update from our club’s historian, Sydney C.

This year in Girls Who Code we were basically covering coding from learning how to make a square to art and now video games. This week the group learned to make video games. It was hard to make the programs because you had to be precise on making one section at a time. The computer only responds to the program we give it so that was the hardest part but overall the staff and student ambassadors were helpful, gave you tips into creating a programs, and they were generous to help and support us students into this program so I thank you all. :­) :­) :­)

We made a short video of some of the girls’ projects during week three. Enjoy!


Status of Women in the Geosciences

Ioana StefanescuFriend of WISE, Dr. Roy Plotnick, WISE student, Ionana Steanescu (pictured at left) and Dr. Alycia L. Stigall of Ohio University (whose lab alumni include former WISE Chic President Jennifer Bauer), have published a paper on the status of women in the geosciences by examining who has been presenting at the North American Paleontological Convention (NAPC). NAPC is held every four to five years and is the one conference where all the different flavors of geoscience gather together.

What they found is that participation of women has increased over the years and that this increase is due to collaboration. Women’s increase in presenting at the meeting is not reducing men’s participation as 90% of the abstracts included a male name. This does mean that women were more likely to be part of a group of presenters than to be solo authors. The other finding of note is that the increase in women’s representation appears to be attributable to an increase in student authorship.

While the news is good in the geosciences in terms of women’s participation in this specific and important meeting, the authors do note that there is still a lack of women in leadership positions and being keynote speakers. This speaks to one aspect of WISE’s work. While we want to see the number of women go up in STEM, we also want to see women’s role in leading their respective fields go up as well.

Evolution of paleontology: Long-term gender trends in an earth-science discipline
Roy E. Plotnick, Alycia L. Stigall, Ioana Stefanescu


WISE bringing Girls Who Code to UIC!

Our Women in Science & Engineering program is excited to announce our new partnership with Girls Who Code!

MISSION: Girls Who Code programs work to inspire, educate, and equip girls with the computing skills to pursue 21st century opportunities.

To kick off the chapter, we will have an information meeting on Saturday, October 4th from 10 am – 12 pm at the WISE office:

845 W. Taylor Street
Room 205 D
Chicago, IL 60607

Our first GWC meeting will take place on Saturday, October 18th – same time and place as the information meeting.

To learn more about WISE’s GWC chapter, please visit our webpage. Additional questions can be sent to WISE Community Outreach at WISE_OutreachATuic.edu.


WISE Featured in the Chicago Sun-Times

Women in Science and Engineering’s mentoring intiatives and the Presidential Award of Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring is featured in an article in the March 5, 2011 edition of the Chicago Sun-Times. The print edition incorrectly listed women faculty in biological sciences at 65% when it is 22.1%. This is corrected in the online edition.


WISE Receives Presidential Award in Mentoring

Women in Science and Engineering’s Mentoring Initiatives has received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring.“The Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, awarded by the White House each year to individuals or organizations, recognize the crucial role that mentoring plays in the academic and personal development of students studying science or engineering—particularly those who belong to groups that are underrepresented in those fields. By offering their expertise and encouragement, mentors help prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers while ensuring that tomorrow’s innovators reflect the full diversity of the United States.” The WISE team visited Washington, DC to accept the award and the Director of the Center for Research on Women and Gender was shown (at 4:35) in West Wing Week.


UIC News follows up on our trip to DC

pic2-15039UIC News wrote a follow-up article on our trip to Washington, DC to receive the Presidential Award. It features a great picture of CRWG Director, Stacie Geller, meeting President Obama in the Oval Office.


President Hogan blogs about WISE

University of Illinois President Mike Hogan blogged about WISE and the Presidential Award.


WISE to receive Presidential Award

Leaders of UIC’sWomen in Science and Engineering program, which encourages girls and young women in math and science, will accept a presidential award for mentoring at a White House ceremony Thursday.

The program in the Center for Research on Women and Gender is among four organizations and 11 individuals across the U.S. to receive the 2011 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring. UIC is the only winner in Illinois.

The award, announced Friday by President Barack Obama, honors the WISE mentoring initiatives and includes a $10,000 grant for continued mentoring work.

“These individuals and organizations have gone above and beyond the call of duty to ensure that the United States remains on the cutting edge of science and engineering for years to come,” Obama said in announcing the awards.

“Their devotion to the educational enrichment and personal growth of their students is remarkable, and these awards represent just a small token of our enormous gratitude.”

 

Read the rest at UIC News


WISE Wing on YouTube

wisewing-altoidtinBeth Cowgill, WISE Wing Peer Mentor, leds students in making battery chargers for iPods and other electronic devices out of Altoid tins. 


Program helps girls get WISE to nanotechnology

Program helps girls get WISE to nanotechnology

From the UIC News :

11/28/07 ~ Christy Blandford

UIC’s Women in Science and Engineering program is heading into cyberspace to teach girls about an emerging science field.The group’s Women in Nanotechnology program received a $50,000 grant from the Motorola Foundation to create an online mentoring network.

The network will connect girls in elementary through high school with nanotechnology professionals.

“Nanotechnology is changing everything in our world,” said Veronica Arreola, director of UIC’s WISE program.

“It really is a rapidly growing field. Part of our mission is to get our women and girls hooked into fields that are growing.”

The mentoring network will provide the girls with information on nanotechnology — the ability to manipulate materials on atomic or molecular scales to produce microscopic devises.

Nanotechnology is used in many consumer products, Arreola said.

“Nanotechnology is in our lipsticks, shampoos, sunscreens, our iPods — it touches everything,” she said.

“It’s definitely something where a girl could say: ‘I’m not really into science, but I want to have my own makeup line.’ Well, now you are into science.”

The mentoring program will be set up through a social networking site, similar to MySpace or Facebook, Arreola said, where girls can ask questions about nanotechnology or seek career advice.

“We see that online social networking is increasing — the MySpaces, the Facebooks really seem to be where the younger students are,” she said. “Instead of leading them to where we think they should be, we’d rather go to where they are.”

At first, the network will link girls in the Chicago area with Motorola professionals. But the program should eventually have a national scope, Arreola said.

The network is in its planning stages, but Arreola hopes to have it running in early 2008.

Women are well suited to work in nanotechnology, said G. Ali Mansoori, professor of bioengineering and chemical engineering.

Nanotechnology equipment requires great precision and accuracy, he said.

“I think there are probably more women than men in nanotechnology because women are so much more careful,” he said. “They do a better job of understanding nanotechnology.”

Mansoori teaches BIOE 494 and CHE 494, courses on atomic and molecular nanotechnology. He said about half of the students in the courses are women.

Cultivating an interest in nanotechnology among girls is important because the science is expected to be “the route to the next industrial revolution,” he said.

“It’s a new, evolving field that you see more women in,” he said.

“It’s a really important subject and it’s a developing subject.”