Category: News-CRWG

2015 Dan Award Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals: 2015 Alice J. Dan Dissertation Research Award

The 14th Annual Alice J. Dan Dissertation Research Award encourages original and significant research about sex, gender and/or women by UIC doctoral students. The award is open to UIC doctoral students in any field who have completed the requirements for candidacy and have an approved dissertation proposal by the application deadline. Award(s) will range from $500-$1,000.

To apply for the award, please submit:

  1. Cover Letter:
    • A cover letter addressed to the “Dan Award Review Committee.” The cover letter should include the title of the proposal, the applicant’s contact information (email, phone, and address), and the name of the applicant’s advisor. In addition, the cover letter should briefly address the following questions:
      • How has your academic training prepared you to accomplish the proposed research?
      • How will receiving the Dan Award, which typically ranges from $500 to $1000, award help you in your research?
  1. Award Application:
    • Award applications should be no more than 5 double-spaced pages. Please use 1-inch margins and a standard 12-point font (e.g. Arial, Times New Roman, etc.)
    • Applications must include:
      • Summary of research (200 words or less)
      • Significance of research for women and/or gender
      • Research methods
      • Progress to date
      • Timetable for completion
      • Budget
      • Bibliography/References cited (reference list does not count towards the 5-page limit)
  1. Additional Supporting Materials:
  • Two letters of reference (one from dissertation advisor documenting approval of dissertation research). Reference letters may be sent separately.

Review criteria include: potential for contribution to research on women and/or gender, originality and significance to the major field, research methodology, academic preparation and ability to accomplish the work, feasibility of timetable for completion, feasibility of budget.

Complete applications should be submitted in PDF format and e-mailed to Kris Zimmermann at kzimme3@uic.edu.

The submission deadline is Monday, June 1, 2015. Winners will be announced in July 2015.

For more information contact Kris Zimmermann at (312) 413-4251 or kzimme3@uic.edu. Visit the Dan Dissertation Award web page at http://crwg.uic.edu/crwg-home/dan-dissertation-award/ to view past awardees.


2nd Annual Women’s Health Research Day Call for Abstracts

The UIC Center for Research on Women and Gender/National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health, in partnership with the UIC BIRCWH (Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health) program and other local groups, sponsors our 2nd annual Women’s Health Research Day to promote research and advance understanding of new developments in women’s health. This half-day event provides an opportunity for faculty, fellows, and students to network and to showcase their research through poster and oral presentations.

When: Tuesday, April 21, 2015, 9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Where: Thompson Room, Student Center West, 828 S. Wolcott Ave, University of Illinois at Chicago

Call for Abstracts (Abstract deadline: Monday, March 23, 2015): Students, fellows, staff, and faculty are invited present a poster on women’s health or sex differences research. For abstract guidelines and to submit an abstract, visit: https://uofi.uic.edu/fb/sec/5481083. The top two abstracts will be invited to present 15-minute oral presentations. Cash prizes will be awarded for top abstracts and top posters.

Keynote Lecture: “Women Living with HIV,” featuring Monica Gandhi, MD, MPH,Professor of Medicine in the Division of HIV/AIDS,University of California, San Francisco

Monica Gandhi MD, MPH is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of HIV/AIDS at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the Medical Director of the HIV/AIDS Clinic (“Ward 86″) at San Francisco General Hospital. Past research efforts focused on HIV/AIDS in U.S. women through the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), a multisite, prospective cohort study established in 1994 to study the natural history, clinical and laboratory findings of HIV in women. Currently, she is investigating low-cost solutions to measuring antiretroviral levels in resource-poor settings, such as determining drug levels in hair samples. Dr. Gandhi also leads multiple HIV education and mentorship programs at UCSF. She is the principal investigator of an R24 mentoring grant from the NIH focused on nurturing early career investigators of diversity in HIV research and the Associate Director for the Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) Mentoring Program.

Registration: Advance registration required. Registration coming soon!

For more information, please contact Kris Zimmermann at kzimme3@uic.edu or 312.413.4251.


Former BIRCWH scholar Julienne Rutherford’s paper inspires Society of American Archaeology to implement sexual harassment initiatives

The President of the Society of American Archaeology (SAA) sent an email to their entire membership about the sexual harassment initiatives that were inspired by the SAFE study written by former BIRCWH scholar Julienne Rutherford and colleagues:

Here is an excerpt from the email:

“…SAA initiated three actions. First, The Board of Directors directed the Ethics Committee to consider sexual harassment of all kinds in the current revisions to the SAA ethics principles. This review is underway. Second, the Board of Directors passed a motion requiring organizations sponsoring SAA fieldschool scholarships to have written policies and procedures relating the sexual harassment. All such scholarships now have these stipulations. Third, as a sponsoring organization, SAA requested that the Register of Professional Archaeologists issue a statement regarding a RPA’s obligations with regards to eliminating sexual harassment in archaeological settings. I am pleased to announce that the Register has completed its statement, which is included below. The President and Board will keep you posted as the Ethics Committee works on this, and other matters come to fruition later this year.”


WISE Girls Who Code featured in UIC News

This past fall, our Women in Science and Engineering program began a chapter of Girls Who Code, a national organization with a mission to provide computer science education and exposure to girls. Our Girls Who Code program was recently featured in UIC News.  Read more at: http://news.uic.edu/girls-who-code


CRWG Director Presents on Global Maternal Health Research

On January 14, 2015, CRWG Director Stacie Geller presented her research at UIC’s sixth Campus Insights presentation. This year’s theme was UIC: Research and Innovation on a Global Scale. The presentations used the art of imagery and words to provide insights into the purpose of research at UIC: to apply new knowledge to the real world and make a difference. Dr. Geller’s presentation was captured on video, and is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZew2we5ut0&list=PLmq5H6mJIf-JhHDP4FrOsQndCu8hIQJQk&index=6


BIRCWH Program Accepting Applications For Scholar Position

The BIRCWH Program is currently accepting applications for one scholar position to begin on April 1st, 2015.  Applications are due by February 13th, 2015.

Please visit our Scholar Application page if interested in applying and for more detailed information.


Fall 2014 CRWG Newsletter Now Available

The Fall 2014 edition of the CRWG Newsletter, Building Research Connections, is now available. Check it out here: Building Research Connections Fall 2014.


BIRCWH Scholar Kirstie Danielson’s NIH presentation available online

BIRCWH scholar Kirstie Danielson’s NIH presentation can be viewed here.  Her talk begins approximately 4 hours and 15 minutes into the video.


CRWG Partners with Mujeres Latinas en Accion on Economic Security Report

Mujeres1

The Center for Research on Women and Gender partnered with Mujeres Latinas en Accion, the longest-standing Latina organization in the country, on their latest “Latina Portrait” annual policy report. This year’s report focused on economic security. CRWG Assistant Director Veronica Arreola wrote the introduction to the report and attended the report release press conference in September.

Mujeres2

The study found that Latin@s* are overrepresented in Chicago’s low-wage workforce. While they make up 26% of the city’s population, 42% of low-wage workers are Latin@. Undocumented Latin@s are most at risk for living in poverty. Due to their status, undocumented Latinas often must choose undesirable low-wage work or informal work in which they cannot fight for better pay or working conditions due to threat of being fired or deported. These low-wage industries also often expose Latinas to exploitation from supervisors. Undocumented Latin American women are at an increased risk of experiencing wage theft or being paid less than minimum wage, as well as sexual violence. This situation has local implications, as women comprise nearly half of the undocumented population in Illinois.

The impact of low-wage work on Latinas is exemplified by the monthly cost of childcare in Illinois, which can total $1,469, while a full-time minimum wage earner will make just $1,430 a month. The high cost of child care may keep Latinas in low-wage work because it limits the type of work they can do, in attempt to minimize childcare costs.

The “Latina Portrait” did not just paint a bleak state of affairs. It ends with a number of policy recommendations including raising the minimum wage, establishing earned sick-time, and creating a domestic workers bill of rights. Recommendations for action are detailed for allies who work in local government, labor and service organizations, and academia.

To read the full report, visit Mujeres Latinas en Accion and click on “Latina Portrait: Latinas and Economic Security.”

*Using Latin@ instead of “Latino” recognizes both Latinos and Latinas. For this Latina Portrait, Latin@ was used to differentiate between Latin@s of all genders and when just talking about Latina women.


CRWG Collaborates on Needs Assessment to Prevent Maternal Mortality in Tanzania

CRWG director Stacie Geller and collaborator Crystal Patil, associate professor of medical anthropology in the College of Nursing, are recipients of the inaugural Global Health and Wellbeing Seed Grant Program, established by the Chancellor’s Global Excellence Task Force and the College of Medicine’s Center for Global Health. The seed grant program was created to support projects that improve the lives of people around the world. The program provided start-up funding for three multidisciplinary research projects, to assist researchers in seeking external funding in the future.

Drs. Patil and Geller will work together to conduct a needs assessment in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, with a focus on reducing maternal mortality. Based on the needs assessment, they will adapt a continuum-of-care approach for city residents. The continuum of care approach has successfully reduced maternal deaths from postpartum hemorrhage in rural areas of the developing world. The goal of the research is to identify factors that put urban women at risk of dying from postpartum bleeding.

For more information, visit: http://news.uic.edu/seed-grants-foster-research-projects-in-global-health#sthash.LDbcKNJm.dpuf